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'The Vampire Chronicles' certainly classify as one book for the purpose of this discussion. I made it to Memnoch the Devil before stopping permanently, which is oddly missing from your list (Rice released it right after Body Thief). They weren't bad books by any stretch but I THINK she took a bit of a break there, so I did as well. Queen of the Damned is the one I remember the most because it had that global feel to it that I really love in series when all the moving pieces start to come together. The diverse cast and very thorough explanation of the creation 'myth' behind Rice's vampires was a winner for me. Vampire Lestat was a bit rambly and Body Thief felt more like a side story. Memnoch felt smart and clever at the time with its what-ifs but I suspect anyone who has read or seen The Last Temptation (of Christ) by Kazantzakis would agree the devilish what-if was handled much better there.

Sadly Rice seemed to lose the plot a bit not too long after penning her core Vampire novels. I remember when she took her own stab at writing a Christ/Judas story and no one really cared. Bit like Pullman's, except at least she can actually write a halfway decent story with interesting characters. It's clear these authors are endlessly fascinated by the dynamics of the Bible's biggest hits (and by extension Milton's take on wtf happened between Genesis and Revelation from the perspective of the Fallen), specifically the fraternal love, the philia (brotherly love, love for one's neighbours) underpinning the agape (pure love between God and Man). But they do best, I think, when they stick to well-removed representations of such. Vampires and wizards and shit.

鬼殺し
Jun 07, 2019 00:21:58 AM

"
鬼殺し wrote:
'The Vampire Chronicles' certainly classify as one book for the purpose of this discussion. I made it to Memnoch the Devil before stopping permanently, which is oddly missing from your list (Rice released it right after Body Thief). They weren't bad books by any stretch but I THINK she took a bit of a break there, so I did as well. Queen of the Damned is the one I remember the most because it had that global feel to it that I really love in series when all the moving pieces start to come together. The diverse cast and very thorough explanation of the creation 'myth' behind Rice's vampires was a winner for me. Vampire Lestat was a bit rambly and Body Thief felt more like a side story. Memnoch felt smart and clever at the time with its what-ifs but I suspect anyone who has read or seen The Last Temptation (of Christ) by Kazantzakis would agree the devilish what-if was handled much better there.

Sadly Rice seemed to lose the plot a bit not too long after penning her core Vampire novels. I remember when she took her own stab at writing a Christ/Judas story and no one really cared. Bit like Pullman's, except at least she can actually write a halfway decent story with interesting characters. It's clear these authors are endlessly fascinated by the dynamics of the Bible's biggest hits (and by extension Milton's take on wtf happened between Genesis and Revelation from the perspective of the Fallen), specifically the fraternal love, the philia (brotherly love, love for one's neighbours) underpinning the agape (pure love between God and Man). But they do best, I think, when they stick to well-removed representations of such. Vampires and wizards and shit.


I love Anne Rice vampires because her vampires have mythology and history. Her vampires became my standard for vampires so any vampires that do not share similarities from her vampires do not get my interest (twilight vampires). I developed a taste for ancient vampires so the more older the vampire is the more I get interested to it so Lestat is my least favorite vampire because he is young in vampire standard.

elemental_oasis
Jun 07, 2019 09:36:48 AM

I think my favourite vampire novels are the Watch books by Sergei Lukyanenko. I mean, the movies were pretty great but the books are much more deeply rooted in Russo-Slavic lore. Give me more bestial, primal vampires than the urbane 'Masquerade kindred' any day.

鬼殺し
Jun 07, 2019 14:17:47 PM

"
鬼殺し wrote:
I think my favourite vampire novels are the Watch books by Sergei Lukyanenko. I mean, the movies were pretty great but the books are much more deeply rooted in Russo-Slavic lore. Give me more bestial, primal vampires than the urbane 'Masquerade kindred' any day.



Same here. I read both Rice's and Lukyanenko's and, while I liked both, the latter was my favorite.

Lately , I've been reading some really nice books, thrillers, that I'd really reccomend ... but they're in italian and haven't been translated afaik, so...

if you know italian or just curious
Spoiler
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paola_Barbato she is the author I'm referring to, great narrative and plot in both the books I've read so far, Zoo and Non ti faccio niente

Other than these, I've lately read a good sci-fi trilogy, SHIFT, WOOL and DUST (3 books,by Hugh Howey); they're available also as eBooks.
I really enjoyed reading it and would recommend if you like the genre.

Wazz72
Jun 07, 2019 15:29:29 PM

Just because you made the claim that this is the best thread on this forum, I would still argue that the carved skulls .... oh Charan I finally caught the literary --- fine I'll give it to you =p

SeCKSEgai
Jun 08, 2019 07:59:25 AM

"
SeCKSEgai wrote:
Just because you made the claim that this is the best thread on this forum, I would still argue that the carved skulls .... oh Charan I finally caught the literary --- fine I'll give it to you =p


Was it ever yours to give? :P

But yes. I am fairly confident this will be the best thread about discussing books on the forum, for a while yet anyway. Until the local smartypants figure out a way to taunt and mock the moderators with it.

So, where's your contribution hm?

鬼殺し
Jun 08, 2019 08:19:20 AM

I read this really good book about a young man and a sword, and the manipulation he went through at the hands of a sociopathic mentalist...

Cant remember the name of it but the author has promised a sequal.. at some time.... Charan...


Cheers,
Matt.

P.S. The Odyssey and Beowulf and Henry V were the last 3 this year so far. Sometimes classics really hit the spot.

essemoni
Jun 08, 2019 10:28:05 AM

"
essemoni wrote:
I read this really good book about a young man and a sword, and the manipulation he went through at the hands of a sociopathic mentalist...

Cant remember the name of it but the author has promised a sequal.. at some time.... Charan...


Cheers,
Matt.

P.S. The Odyssey and Beowulf and Henry V were the last 3 this year so far. Sometimes classics really hit the spot.


Did you get around to watching The Hollow Crown? Extremely entertaining BBC mega mini-series of the Henriad. Cumberbatch plays a wicked Richard III.

'sociopath mentalist'. I like it. I was cleaning my room yesterday and found a printout of my 'blurbs' for all the other books. Encouraging. Invigorating. More is coming. All I'll say.

__

Not really a recommendation or a naysay, but right now I feel for ASOIAF fans, pretty hard. Not only did you guys get a disappointing conclusion to the big budget TV series adapting the series, Martin's been stuck in prequel and side-project land for years. With the announcement of that collaboration with From Software, Eldren Ring, I imagine fans are both excited to see Martin's hand working a Dark Souls' type game, but also a bit sad that this means he's probably not grinding away at Winter/Spring. And he's not getting any younger...

鬼殺し
Jun 12, 2019 03:25:15 AM

Lila by Marilynne Robinson

Housekeeping is one of my favorite books of all time, so I read anything Robinson writes.

This is the third book that reuses the characters of Gilead.

As usual, absolutely beautiful written book and I love Robinson's mix of stream of consciousness as well as somewhat Hemingway-esque style.

Housekeeping is still leaps and bounds above these Gilead-themed books as far as Im concerned, mostly because of subject matter hitting very close to home. But, still recommend anything she writes.

Do note, that her books dont have much of a plot and they aren't an easy read at all. It's not quite Ulysses in terms of language complexity or anything, but they aren't something you read for sheer entertainment in its purest form.

grepman
Jun 12, 2019 04:16:16 AM

"
grepman wrote:
Lila by Marilynne Robinson

Housekeeping is one of my favorite books of all time, so I read anything Robinson writes.

This is the third book that reuses the characters of Gilead.

As usual, absolutely beautiful written book and I love Robinson's mix of stream of consciousness as well as somewhat Hemingway-esque style.

Housekeeping is still leaps and bounds above these Gilead-themed books as far as Im concerned, mostly because of subject matter hitting very close to home. But, still recommend anything she writes.

Do note, that her books dont have much of a plot and they aren't an easy read at all. It's not quite Ulysses in terms of language complexity or anything, but they aren't something you read for sheer entertainment in its purest form.


Whoa, hardcore stuff. Delved a bit. Fascinating. I'll start with Gilead. Thanks!

鬼殺し
Jun 12, 2019 04:31:58 AM
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